Quick Answer: What Is The Best Treatment For Dysphagia?

Can dysphagia go away on its own?

Dysphagia is a another medical name for difficulty swallowing.

This symptom isn’t always indicative of a medical condition.

In fact, this condition may be temporary and go away on its own..

What is the likely cause of the dysphagia?

Certain disorders — such as multiple sclerosis, muscular dystrophy and Parkinson’s disease — can cause dysphagia. Neurological damage. Sudden neurological damage, such as from a stroke or brain or spinal cord injury, can affect your ability to swallow.

What is the most common complication of dysphagia?

The most common complications of dysphagia are aspiration pneumonia, malnutrition and dehydration; other possible complications, such as intellectual and body development deficit in children with dysphagia, or emotional impairment and social restriction have not been studied thoroughly.

What foods are good for dysphagia?

The following are some of the permitted foods:Pureed breads (also called “pre-gelled” breads)Smooth puddings, custards, yogurts, and pureed desserts.Pureed fruits and well-mashed bananas.Pureed meats.Souffles.Well-moistened mashed potatoes.Pureed soups.Pureed vegetables without lumps, chunks, or seeds.

Does dysphagia get worse?

Dysphagia can come and go, be mild or severe, or get worse over time. If you have dysphagia, you may: Have problems getting food or liquids to go down on the first try. Gag, choke, or cough when you swallow.

Can anxiety cause swallowing problems?

Stress or anxiety may cause some people to feel tightness in the throat or feel as if something is stuck in the throat. This sensation is called globus sensation and is unrelated to eating. However, there may be some underlying cause. Problems that involve the esophagus often cause swallowing problems.

What is a common treatment for persons with swallowing difficulties?

Difficulty swallowing associated with GERD can be treated with prescription oral medications to reduce stomach acid. You may need to take these medications for an extended period. If you have eosinophilic esophagitis, you may need corticosteroids. If you have esophageal spasm, smooth muscle relaxants may help.

How is dysphagia treated?

Treatments for dysphagia include: speech and language therapy to learn new swallowing techniques. changing the consistency of food and liquids to make them safer to swallow. alternative forms of feeding, such as tube feeding through the nose or stomach.

What are the signs of dysphagia?

Other signs of dysphagia include:coughing or choking when eating or drinking.bringing food back up, sometimes through the nose.a sensation that food is stuck in your throat or chest.persistent drooling of saliva.being unable to chew food properly.a ‘gurgly’ wet sounding voice when eating or drinking.

What type of doctor treats dysphagia?

An otolaryngologist, who treats ear, nose, and throat problems. A gastroenterologist, who treats problems of the digestive system. A neurologist, who treats problems of the brain, spinal cord, and nervous system. A speech-language pathologist, who evaluates and treats swallowing problems.

What are three disorders that cause dysphagia?

Neurological conditions that can cause swallowing difficulties are: stroke (the most common cause of dysphagia); traumatic brain injury; cerebral palsy; Parkinson disease and other degenerative neurological disorders such as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS, also known as Lou Gehrig’s disease), multiple sclerosis, …

How do I strengthen my swallowing muscles?

As example, you may be asked to:Inhale and hold your breath very tightly. … Pretend to gargle while holding your tongue back as far as possible. … Pretend to yawn while holding your tongue back as far as possible. … Do a dry swallow, squeezing all of your swallowing muscles as tightly as you can.